Blog Post 8

By Looking into my thoughts.. Originally published at Looking into my thoughts..

I think growing up in a generation where we are consumed with social media and showing off everything – from what we eat to our daily selfies- we constantly crave attention and want to be relatable to our fellow peers. Personally when I think of the word relatable, I think of something that is ordinary or standard. I think being “relatable” to something has just categorized us into a narrow perspective on things. Just because you can’t sense a connection with an idea or thought doesn’t mean that its not credible. I agree with Mead’s thoughts on relatability and how rejecting a piece of work just because it doesn’t reflect us or our ideas is going to hurt yourself and be your loss because you fail to see literature from other perspectives. If we always felt like we agreed with a piece of writing, our minds would never be stimulated to question our differences.

Now looking back to all the literary pieces we read pertaining to tight spaces, there wasn’t a single one that I could fully relate to in a literal sense. For example, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, I could never relate to being an African American woman who struggles with slavery and the fight to live. However, this doesn’t mean that I think this novel isn’t credible. As you read through the novel and realize that she was abused at such a young age makes me want to not believe her life story- but I think I realized that her in order to relate to her pain I need to understand the circumstances she was in. I praise the perspective the novel is written in and although I can’t relate, I feel a strong connection of compassion for Jacobs. I believe that relatability doesn’t always have to be your mirror image, but something that you sense a connection with, have it be physical, emotional, or spiritual. If you can accept the fact that people are different than you can learn to accept that their point of view is relatable.

On a personal note, growing up as a first generation Indian I had some trouble relating to American customs. I still remember my mom giving me rice and curry for lunch rather than the usual Lunchables box. Being so young, I felt uncomfortable because I felt like I couldn’t relate to others, and felt like what I was doing was wrong. However, as I grow up I embrace my differences and realize that I will not be someone else’s definition of “normal”. I have my own identity, my own story and if people cant recognize my individuality than it’s their loss.

This American Life Blog Post

By Looking into my thoughts.. Originally published at Looking into my thoughts..

The narration that stood out to me the most was the one by David Sedaris on cell phone usage in restrooms. I found the narration quite funny and shameful for humans. The story starts out abruptly with the narrator retelling a story about a man using his phone in the stall. If a space alien came and listened to the conversation they were having they would’ve thought humans are too attached to their technology. The fact that humans cannot leave their tiny electronics even when they go to the bathroom is DISGUSTING. It’s ironic that of all places you would want to be concerned about your cleanliness you wouldn’t mind contaminating your phone. Also they Also the tone of the man talking on the phone is very rude. This just gives a bad impression of humans.
However, the way the story is narrated and the narrator showed two personalities of humans. One is the careless, Wall Street, bougie sounding man versus the curious, innocent, simple man. However, as the story about the man and his technology continued, the narrator took a turn and started talking about the relevance of the story relating to his sister. This shows that humans value relationships and form connections and bonds with each other no matter what the circumstance is. Anyways, the story took a very humorous turn when David started talking about his sister. It was hilarious when his innocent minded connected the dots and realized that his sister struggles with the same problem of using her phone on the toilet.
The whole series just seemed a little random and didn’t really serve a purpose so if a space alien came to hear this he would’ve thought humans value and are concerned about small, unimportant things. However, if you reflect back on this story you will learn that it gives the most insight to the life style of humans in the 21st century. If we look at the positives, couldn’t we say that humans value their time and social relationships?

Revision about Sentimentalism

By Looking into my thoughts.. Originally published at Looking into my thoughts..

As Sunday night commenced, people from all over the United States were eager to watch, the well-known Academy Awards. We all know the real reason we watch it- beautiful gowns, favorite movies, and the flawless actors. Also, who can forget the amazing singers that perform on the stage for a few minutes and pour their heart out into melodies? But this time it was different. As Common and John Legend ended their heart-warming song, “Glory”, from the civil rights film Selma, they both gave their acceptance speeches- a little differently. They didn’t use this time to thank their families or co-workers but instead used a sentimental tactic and spoke boldly about the social injustice present in the United States today. This approach was different because they brought up such a idea about social conflict in an obscure, high society setting. However, this was perfect because they knew that the message would be projected to viewers all across the United States.

When you think of famous people bringing up bold topics on injustice and equality you see them present these on social media or through interviews. Award shows are rarely seen as places to bring these topics up. However, this is why John Legend and Common’s method was so effective and sentimental. By singing the song “Glory” and visually displaying scenes where people of color are seen to be tortured and hurt, by which both singers captured viewer’s hearts. They showed scenes that would cause the audience to cry and created a somber mood.

There are no limitations for creating a sentimental mood because as Google states “the excessive expression of feelings of tenderness, sadness, or nostalgia in behavior, writing, or speech” and therefore there is no restriction on how or what can be said or seen to convey sentimental ideas. Overall, I do believe all generations view sentiment the same way because they are not defined by the viewers, but in the context that it’s presented. Sentimental ideas can be so bold and emotional that the viewers should be able to decipher the tone and idea those ideas are trying to convey. Our world revolves around social media and this powerful source is what I believe will help us bring change. All you really need is an emotional, bold statement followed by a picture or hash tag in which you can get the whole world to hear your voice. That’s why famous artists like John Legend can make such a huge impact on starting revolutionary movements.

The idea of sentimentalism is cushioned by emotions. We see this happening everyday in our lives without realizing it. It happens when your parents guilt trip you into doing the dishes or like Harriet Jacobs when she was contemplating her situation between her master and “lover”. Both ideas are allow our emotions to make the decision for us rather than our judgment based on the facts. Overall, I don’t think “abusing” sentimental tactics is necessarily negative. It’s just the way us humans think, feel, and act to sentimental ideas that makes us who we are. John Legend’s bold song about Selma and his speech concerning the inequality present between minorities in America created both a spark on social media and set a milestone for our global community.

Blog Post 6: Sentimentalism

By Looking into my thoughts.. Originally published at Looking into my thoughts..

As Sunday night commenced, people from all over the United States were eager to watch, the well-known Academy Awards. We all know the real reason we watch it- beautiful gowns, our favorite movies, and the actors. Also, who could forget the amazing singers that go up on the stage for a few minutes and pour their hearts out into melodies. Although, this time it was different. As Common and John Legend ended their heart-warming song, “Glory”, from the civil rights film Selma, they both gave their acceptance speeches a little differently. They didn’t use this time to thank their family or co-workers but instead used a sentimental tactic and spoke boldly about the social injustice present in the United States today. This approach was different because the setting that they brought up this topic in about social conflict was one where you rarely see such controversies. When you think of famous people bringing up bold topics on injustice and equality you see them present these on social media or through interviews. Award shows are rarely seen as places to bring these topics up. However, this is why their method was so effective and sentimental. By singing the song “Glory” and visually displaying scenes where people of color are negatively impacted, both singers captured viewer’s hearts. They showed scenes that would cause the audience to cry and created a somber mood. There are no limitations for creating a sentimental scene because as the Dictionary.com definition states “sentiment is an attitude towards something; opinion” and therefore there is no restriction on how or what can be said or seen to convey sentimental ideas. Overall, I do believe all generations view sentiment the same way because the concept of sentimentalism is not defined by the viewers, but in the context that it’s presented. Sentimental ideas can be so bold and emotional that the viewers should be able to decipher the tone and idea the ideas are trying to convey.

Blog Post 5: Remix

By Looking into my thoughts.. Originally published at Looking into my thoughts..

Many years ago, to my surprise, I found work in America. There were some difficulties with the mental and physical work I had to do. The laws of labor were new to me. I was the man whose educational wants were limited in kind and in degree. Yet here and there men and women were ignorantly sinning against the laws by which they were to live. I was afraid of the wear and tear that should arise, demanding strength from weakness. The man who sleeps loses time and money. There was new cruel competition and I saw exacting habits of business. But before venturing anew upon a subject, especially with upper classes, I became nervous. My health deteriorated. It cost the hastening of my breathing and increasing the secretions of the skin. When a man uses his muscles, after a time comes the feeling called fatigue–a sensation always referred to the muscles, and due most probably to the deposit in the tissues of certain substances formed during motor activity. Warned by this weariness, the man takes rest. There is desire to lie down and rest. Although I have partially recovered, I am now always warned when I have done enough, by lessening ease in my work, and by a sense of fullness and tension in the head. After the great heat of the summer, I found work at a school. When, in a school of forty or more, I felt obliged to teach 2 to 3 hours a day. Overtime, labor in America felt bearable and I attempted to carry the responsibilities of great men.

MLA Citation:

Mitchell, Silar W. “Wear and Tear Or, Hints for the Overworked.” Project Gutenberg, 17 Aug. 2004. Web. 19 Feb. 2015.